Tranexamic Acid (TXA) Dosing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty - Wesley Research Institute
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The purpose of the study is to evaluate a product called Tranexamic Acid (TXA) and its best use in patients who are undergoing total knee replacement.

Research Objectives

Status

Current

Recruitment

Open

Estimated completion

December 2023

Patient Group

Patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery (arthroplasty)

Total Participants

80

Study location

Wesley Research Institute, Griffith University

Study type

Investigator Initiated
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Lead investigators

  • A/Prof Susan Clark

Experienced investigators

  • Prof Robert Ware

Clinical Trial Coordinator

  • Emma Brownrigg

Technical title

A Prospective, Randomised Non-Blinded Pilot Study to Optimise Oral Tranexamic Acid Dosing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TXA002)

About this research project

The purpose of the study is to evaluate a product called Tranexamic Acid (TXA) and its best use in patients who are undergoing total knee replacement. The product is currently used to reduce bleeding during and after surgical procedures. This can lessen the chance of you needing a blood transfusion and may decrease pain, swelling and recovery time following the operation. Tranexamic Acid is already routinely used by surgeons for patients having joint replacements but there is currently no accurate information about the best dosing of the drug to achieve optimal patient outcomes. This study will assess whether different treatment durations will lead to better results for patients.

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